News type

Opinion

Across Monday and Tuesday 6-7 September, leaders, experts, survivors and advocates will gather virtually for the National Women’s Safety Summit, to discuss the key issues affecting women and their children’s safety, including frontline responses, prevention, coercive control, sexual violence, and the ways in which violence often intersects with other forms of abuse, such as racism, ageism and ableism.

Over recent years, there has been growing awareness around Australia of coercive control as a distinct aspect of domestic, family and sexual violence, characterised by a pattern of controlling and manipulative behaviours that erode the freedom, autonomy and human rights of those subjected to it.